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Good content. With some rework it can be great

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-01-20

This book has very good content but it needs a bit of rework to do away with redundant messaging.

Not for a casual reader

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-10-19

If you are not involved in framing public policy or interested in getting involved in it, you won't miss much if you don't read this book. Even if you are interested in public policy, then too a book on behavioral economics like Danny Kahnemans Thinking, Fast and Slow is a better read.

Mile wide and inch deep

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-09-19

What's good:
The range of topics covered
The authors seemingly genuine interest in China

What's not:
At the outset, the author promises to give an unbiased, historians account of China while sometimes making his personal views clear. In truth it's the other way round. We are almost always listening to his views delivered in a condescending, admonishing or patronising tone and sometimes offered an unbiased historians account. Even his praise is never whole hearted and always tempered in the same breath with cautious riders.
The author relies heavily on personal views and anecdotal evidence that support his views to make sweeping generalizations about the Chinese people and it's leaders.
The listening experience was very dissatisfactory. His arbitrary and inconsistent use of Chinese phrases can be unnecessarily distracting and annoying to listeners. Attempting to dramatise a historical account with affected emotions gives it an impression of a badly delivered soap opera performance and the serious business of a historically accurate account.
Overall a good book to read (not hear) for someone who know nothing about China and is alive to the possible mistakes that can be made by an author of a completely different cultural background while making perfunctory observations about a complex culture like that of the Chinese

Two tests for things money should be able to buy

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-19

Michael J. Sandel proposes two tests that any good or service should pass if it should be allowed to be on sale for money.
You will find yourself agreeing with Sandel on almost all the examples of goods/services that he argues should _not_ be for sale. What he brings to the table though are well formulated arguments that convince you that there is solid basis for that agreement and not just a "gut feel" that it's wrong. What's more, the two tests can be applied to all goods/services and can aid you in convincing yourself if indeed it makes sense for it to be exchanged for money.
Highly recommended read.

A must read for a citizen of any nation

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-05-19

Although Sandel's arguments borrow heavily from incidents in American society, the idea of a what a just and moral society should look like is applicable to any modern democracy. Highly appreciated for everyone interested in being a part of a society that does not shy away from engaging with and valuing the ideas of virtue and morals.

An introduction to contemplative techniques

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-03-19

Sam Harris approaches a difficult subject with his usual clarity of thought. A no nonsense introduction to, and motivation for, the practice of contemplative techniques. Recommend this highly.

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