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Tathagat Varma

Bangalore, India
  • 8
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  • 3
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  • 19
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A well-researched book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-07-19

This book is not just about Indigo, but starts with global history of aviation followed by Indian history of aviation, before finally unfolding the Indigo story. While there is a lot of research that has obviously gone into it, I was hoping to get more insights into Indigo par se.

The narration could be better!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

A good insight into the man who runs Apple

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-06-19

I love Apple #products. They are not simply an object of #art and desire, but also represent some of the timeless #values. Of course, a lot of people disagree with it, but that's fair - every product or service must have people on both sides of it - how else would they get better? But this blog post is not about Apple, but the man who is running it. To think of it, he was a hardcore operations guy who is now running world's leading consumer products company known for its design!

This book is well-researched, and gives a rare insight into Tim Cook's life as a young professional right up to becoming Apple CEO and up until now. The book gives a great insight how Tim's early years at IBM and Compaq gave him the strong operational foundation that Apple once badly lacked, and how he turned it around. The other think that struck me was how he is turning the culture at Apple into more humane. Steve Jobs with all his charisma was known as the guy who called every shot, and while there are people who feel such benevolent dictatorial style might not work for everyone, Tim probably realizes that people won't probably ever see him as that. Thus, he is creating his own unique legacy. Must read for #leaders.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

A gripping tale of deceit and greed...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-05-19

When I had first heard of Elizabeth Holmes some 7-8 years back and she was building Theranos, she instantly became my hero. Here was a young #entrepreneur creating radical breakthroughs and building something of high value to mankind. Her personal commitment to building a company literally single-handedly was the stuff stories were made of! And then one day, it all collapsed!

There is no way you are going to put this book down. It is a well-researched and gripping account of how the truth was indeed stranger than fiction. We live in the golden age of entrepreneurship, and despite all guidance and funding available, a large majority of #startups fail. But what would you call when the founder herself is sell-bent on building a sham startup and instead of systematically building something of meaningful and lasting value, she is creating a dark #culture of deep secrecy, extreme intimidation and coercion, and the business model is simply based on outright fraud? And what were the investors and most importantly, the board, doing? With the kind of high-profile political connections, the board only seemed too happy to oblige! Hopefully it will serve a key lessons at least for some time to come...!

A timeless classic on human behavior

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-04-19

Human behavior appears to be extremely complex and mostly indecipherable. But not when Dale Carnegie explains it! Can't imagine his 1936 book continues to be just as relevant and inspirational as it must have been back then.

In the cutthroat world and light-speed age, niceties of life have been consigned to historical relics of the era gone by! To a large extent we have even stopped expecting nice behavior from people, especially when there is nothing to expect in return. So, reading this timeless classic on human behavior is like taking a dip in oasis and restore your faith in the fundamental human goodness. If I could follow even 5% of what Dale talked about, I would consider myself a good human being.

What I find most interesting is the dozens of stories that so ably demonstrate how easy it really is to win friends and influence people...and yet, we go to extreme lengths to actually do just the opposite, and then we blame human behavior. Perhaps in the coming time when machines, robots and algorithms have taken over most of mechanical and routine work, we will have a huge need to re-connect wit human beings once again. I am sure we will need this book once again then!

A well-researched classic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-04-19

Knowledge management in knowledge industry is a much abused term. It isn't well understood by leaders in a very structured and actionable manner, though team members in the trenches have a fairly good gut feel of it, especially how tacit knowledge gets shared and internalized at an individual level (the fact that process police from ISO, CMMI and Six Sigma so naively and totally disregarded this fact in the context of knowledge industry must be held as a key learning lesson for the future generations). However, all these are highly abstract terms, and an absence of a comprehensive framework rigorously supposed by real-life data is sorely missing. Nonaka and Takeuchi's work is not only a pioneering one, but also a classic for the knowledge era, for their work allows us to elicit key learnings how knowledge gets created, shared, consolidated and baselined in different context.

Even though the book was written over twenty years back, and essentially captures the examples from Japanese companies predominantly in electronics and manufacturing, I can very easily see them applied to knowledge-intensive and creative endeavors such as software development. In software development, we have historically relied on documentation as a means to capture and communicate the knowledge, hardly realizing that most of the associated knowledge continues to reside in the heads of the software developers, and can simply never be documented! Agile movement recognized it and built conceptual models that piggyback on it, but most so-called agile coaches have neither read this book nor been in a situation where they are creating knowledge such as examples from the book to really give them a deep and grounded understanding of how knowledge gets created inside a company. This is a great and mandatory read for anyone involved in any form of leadership role, or involved with how knowledge creation.

Great insights into Y Combinator

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-03-19

The book does great justice to what goes on inside and behind the exclusive Y Combinator. The narration is superb, and I truly enjoyed listening to it, as well as learnt a lot of valuable insights.

A great leadership primer!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-12-18

This is a great book on what leadership as an action is all about, as opposed to leadership as a role. Most new leaders fall into the power trap and believe they are there to lead the teams. Only with time do we learn the hard way that our real job is only to serve people...and the fact that they choose to follow us is simply a by-product of how well we serve them.

Nothing new

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-11-18

I didn't find anything interesting and didn't learn anything new from the book. Maybe I am not the right audience for this book.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful