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Pragya Singhal

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  • 9
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  • 69
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Nope, this one didn't work at all

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-04-21

I had read Helen Hoang 'Kiss Quotient' and then I came to this one. Gosh, I felt Bride test was more of a patience test for me. The story is typical M&B romantic stuff, but then gradually the plot and characters started behaving so weird! For eg, people holding pageant in search of a bride don't offer a cleaning lady that title. If you really want to help someone, loan them some money instead of marrying them and keeping them at home. Also, what's the deal with that guy, his brother should have been the main character! Read some other romantic stuff, save yourself from this one.

The plot was very good

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-04-21

The author did a good job of running a tight plot and got the overall story going fast. Character's background was built through the story, and thus their behaviour made some sense. The first half was the best part, you just want the two main characters to get together at the earliest. and when they are about to, gosh what all goes wrong! I thoroughly enjoyed it and find it to be better than most Rom Com love stories out there.

Intriguing title, stories are ok

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-21

I primarily picked this one up for the title. It projected something that we all tend to win and lose over a period of time with our relationships. The short stories were good, but not great. The overall theme of a story came out very well, but I wouldn't rate them exceptional. I think Jhumpa Lahiri and Sanjeev Sanyal had a better collection vs this.

Social needs and pressures

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-02-21

if this book was called out notorious and made infamous, I can now understand why. It's such a frank narration of what and how society subjects a childless couple to emotional atrocities and socially pulls them down. Truthfully, the couple's behaviour was making them more miserable. The steps they took to conceive and their failure each time. The importance given to certain religious practices and the abject disregard to social norms in the name of god- I found this interesting as it shows that who ever made that custom actually catered to everyones need through that. After having read Poonachi, i had built expectations from the author... and he met all of them.

Fascinating but bit too long and slow

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-12-20

I am a Matt Haig fan, and this is my 5th book from his collection. He has written on a very intersting concept and the overall story when summarised is absolutely fascinating. How the character has lived through different eras, whom all he met, what he learnt and relearnt.... everything is amazing except the pace of the book. it's too slow for my liking. And it got too philosophical at points. Maybe I am not in the same frame of mind as the author intended his reader to be, but c'mon for someone who wrote Human and Midnight Library- this one goes really slow. I am still glad I read it, but I did want it to go a bit faster and get over a bit sooner.

Fun beginning, could have had tighter second half

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-12-20

I came here after watching Netflix Mismatched. Since I had seen the series, I knew of the plot, but the stories are not exactly same. First half of the book was fun. it had the right pace and evolved at the right points. I found the second half dragging a bit. though the emotional stuff was relevant, it could have been a bit tighter. also, since the plot involved a 6 week course plan, suddenly 3 weeks were completely skipped. So much could have evolved in those timelines. Anyway, it was a fun read. the narrators did a good job, but Vikas's imitation of the girl was a bit cringey.

Enjoyable stories, endings could have been subtler

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-20

The author wants people to enjoy satirical short stories (which he feels had become a poor cousin of novels...an idea I reckon with). All the stories shared here are enjoyable,I read them all in one sitting. They were entertaining and most of them belonged to places I could identify. The behaviour of characters and protagonist is so believable that I wonder if they are actually real than fictional. Ending could have been subtler, but that's just me.

another wedding, another story

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-11-20

Having gone through the Crazy rich Asian(CRA) Trilogy (1st one is the best), this book is also on similar lines. People are so rich, that th only thing they are left to worry about is skin colour, race and family honour. There's a wedding, there is young love amongst rich people, there is chase for more richness than happiness and there is unnecessary misery and deceit. From a plot point of view, it's not very exciting- actually it's predictable. the title is misleading also, it's only vanity. I didn't like it as much as CRA.

Story of a boy,his family and many insect+animals

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-11-20

I thought this would be more like Attenborough stuff, but it is a over dramatized life of the author during his stay in Corfu. He got a chance to collect lots of insects, birds, animals and shared their story. It was funny at many points, never sad and overall enjoyable. This would be a great book to have as a kid. as an adult, I wanted more facts than fiction. the narrator did a great job, specially with mom and brother voices.

If economics had consciousness

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-11-20

First of all, since this book was written on early 70's, it's been 50 years that the ideas were shared. I admire the Author for quoting a lot of Buddhist and Gandhian principles. The writing style could have been crisper, but that's the expectation of today's generation. Nonetheless, it talks of some very great concepts. in 70s, talking of how to solve employment while balancing natural resource conservation and even evaluating the cost of setting up a job for such a populous nation is valid even today. The emphasis on education and the cost that society must pay to send a kid to college makes you realise that our efforts must go to nation building also, and not just amassing wealth. The author also calls out that the environmental impact of a small scale industry is small for nature to cover it up, but this fails when a massive industrial setup takes over. for a country like India, it can redefine growth vs the western economies and continue to sustainably survive if we as individuals or government take the right step.