Get Your Free Audiobook

1635

Music and Murder
Written by: David Carrico
Narrated by: George Guidall
Length: 19 hrs and 49 mins

After 30 days, Audible is ₹199/mo. Cancel anytime.

OR

Publisher's Summary

Music...

It's been said that musicians live for the next new sound. Well, the musicians of Europe were presented with the biggest new sound ever when the Ring of Fire brought the future back to 1631. What will the court musicians think when they hear Bach, Stravinsky, and the Beatles? What will the street and tavern musicians think when faced with Johnny Cash, Metallica, and Nirvana? Things don't go smoothly for Marla Linder and her friends. 

And murder...

The 30 Years War was an "interesting" time to be alive, in the proverbial Chinese curse sense of the word. Then Grantville arrived from the future, bringing technology and philosophies that set European civilization on its ear. But that's not all that came back with Grantville. Imagine trying to establish modern police procedures in a time where neither the powers-that-be nor the people underneath them provide much support. Up-timer Byron Chieske and his down-timer partner Gotthilf Hoch walk some mean streets and lonely roads.

©2013 David Carrico (P)2018 Recorded Books

What members say

No Reviews are Available
Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Michael Kasper
  • 29-03-19

Great if you are not interested in a story line

If you are into music styles and music creation. Does not add to the series very well I was bored and didn't finish the book.

7 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 28-05-19

A great idea for a much better book

This book is fine but is such a let down from the premise first given. I wanted to see the effects of a poet listening to rap and loving it, which no one else can understand why. I wanted to see the first downtimer punk band singing Anarchy in the Germanies. I wanted to see the effect of Queen on the new artform of Opera. Instead we get a bunch of little advances to push the music to the 18th centerury.

3 people found this helpful

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Keith K
  • 24-08-19

Only for seriouse classical music fans

A huge amount of technical detail from classical music using an alien, to me, vocabulary. It may be interesting if you understand the classical music vocabulary.