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  • A Revolution Betrayed

  • How Egalitarians Wrecked the British Education System
  • Written by: Peter Hitchens
  • Narrated by: Peter Hitchens
  • Length: 4 hrs and 7 mins

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A Revolution Betrayed

Written by: Peter Hitchens
Narrated by: Peter Hitchens
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Publisher's Summary

There are few subjects these days that cause parents more stress than the education of their children.

In his book, Peter Hitchens describes the misjudgements made by politicians over the years that have led to the increase of class distinction and privilege in our education system. This is of course the opposite of what was intended, especially by former Minister of Education Shirley Williams and Margaret Thatcher, her successor in that role, who closed down many more Grammar Schools than Williams.

Given that the cost of private secondary education is now in the region of £200,000 and the cream of Comprehensive Schools are now oversubscribed (William Ellis, Camden School for Girls, The Oratory, Cardinal Vaughan), parents are spending thousands on private tutoring and fee-paying prep schools in order to get their children into these academically excellent schools. Meanwhile hypocritical Labour politicians like Diane Abbott send their children to expensive private day schools. So, what alternatives – if any – are there?

Peter Hitchens argues that in trying to bring about an educational system which is egalitarian, the politicians have created a system which is the exact opposite. And what’s more, it is a system riddled with anomalies - Sixth Form Colleges select pupils on ability at the age of 15, which rules out any child who does not have major educational backing from home (heavy involvement by working parents or private tutors, for example) and academies also are selective, though they pretend not to be.

This is an in-depth look at the British education system and what will happen if things don’t change radically.

©2022 Peter Hitchens (P)2022 Bloomsbury Publishing Plc

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  • Satisfied
  • 30-11-22

Excellent, as expected.

Fantastic performance, intriguing argument. everything we have come to expect from Peter Hitchens. Thumbs up.

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  • Mike
  • 26-11-22

A project started

An intriguing question is raised but never really answered, quite a superficial look at the issue through the lense of how difficult exams are. Where was the analysis of the long term impacts to the individuals. IE if the purpose of a school is to educate people to prepare them for later life, why not look into where these students ended up? a comparison of the school background of people at the top of every field before, during and after grammars would have been a more complete view. focussed too much on the academic aspects such as exam quality and university admissions and not enough on life outcomes.

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  • OatWood
  • 01-01-23

At last, the truth.

A very well-researched and level-headed indictment of the way egalitarian ideologues destroyed the Grammar school system.

Thomas Sowell calls this the “vision of the anointed” whereby an often perfectly functioning system is viewed, ideologically, as an issue that requires ‘fixing’.

The supposed fix then makes things much worse than they otherwise would have been if left alone.

But at no cost whatsoever to the anointed who have often based entire careers on turning ideology into reality and who then claim that things would have been much worse if they had not acted.

Hitchens is a lone voice on this and many other subjects, and he knows it. Yet he put this work out anyway. I for one applaud him for that.

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  • Martin
  • 31-12-22

Unfortunately Hitchens' worst book

This book doesn't really go anywhere and struggles to back up it's assertions. Peter's pessimism cripples him, preventing him from taking his analysis to real conclusions. Instead, the book spends much it's pages recording MP's hypocritical actions, as if pointing them out was still an impactful thing to do.

Read only if you have a very strong interest in both Peter Hitchens and British education.

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  • Freeman
  • 28-12-22

Excellent argument, which persuaded me

Hitchens makes his point relentlessly & persuasively that the left’s ideological hatred of academic selection at 11+ by merit (justified) has been replaced with selection by wealth (unjustified).

The wrecking of grammar schools & an excellent education system was socialism in action, which Tories went along with.

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 29-11-22

How different things could have been.

Excellent, just wish it was fleshed out more. There was no need for it to be so short, or so scattered jumping from time to time. I wish this had more stats and facts with maybe an actual conclusion as to WHY any of this happened.he is completely correct though, every person I know in education, either sends their child to private school or lives somewhere based on the catchment area.