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Publisher's Summary

Increasing numbers of conservative evangelicals are denying basic tenets of classical Christian teaching about God, with departures occurring even among those of the Calvinistic persuasion. James Dolezal's All That Is in God provides an exposition of the historic Christian position while engaging with these contemporary deviations. 

His convincing critique of the newer position he styles "theistic mutualism" is philosophically robust, systematically nuanced, and biblically based. It demonstrates the need to maintain the traditional viewpoint, particularly on divine simplicity, and spotlights the unfortunate implications for other important Christian doctrines, such as divine eternality and the Trinity, if it were to be abandoned. Arguing carefully and cogently that all that is in God is God himself, the work is sure to stimulate debate on the issue in years to come.

©2018 eChristian (P)2018 eChristian

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  • Andrew Becham
  • 29-09-19

Aristotelianism Presupposed, not Defended

I appreciate the intention and concern this work raises, namely that theology proper in greater evangelicalism has gotten sloppy, particularly with respect to affirming God’s immutability and aseity and denying that He has parts, components, change, etc.
As such, I wholeheartedly affirm divine simplicity in its classical formulation. However, I do not concede that Aristotelian categories can be used to speak univocally of God’s being the way the author does on his positive account of simplicity.
That noted, this critique aligns with the others that call for a justification of Aristotelian categories used throughout the work.
That noted too, the critiques of Drs. John Frame and K. Scott Oliphint many readers familiar with their work will find somewhat ironic. The author scolds them for committing to a form of theistic mutualism (cf. relevant sections in chs. 4 and 5). They allegedly hold that God changes to accommodate Himself to creation (time), has accidental properties (of being creator, redeemer, etc., relative to creation), and can be univocally spoken along these lines (e.g. our language corresponds to real facts about God’s being/properties/attributes). The author seems unfamiliar with the background thought of these opponents. Namely, they follow Van Til’s approach of upholding and defending aseity in terms of classical theism while utilizing the Creator-creature distinction to mediate creaturely knowledge of God to God’s being. How does it work? Analogical knowledge. Look it up. The author then presents a positive account of how God’s being relates to creaturely knowledge in a way fully amenable to the approach of Frame and Oliphint, though in terms that seem to speak of the univocality of the Aristotelian framework on God’s being. As an aside, Thomas’s exegesis of Exodus 3 along these lines is tenuous at best, and Frame deals with Thomas’s system in his Doctrine of God. The author Dolezal, following Aquinas nearly blindly here, does not recognize the irony of his critique and positive presentation afterward. As always, follow up on the footnotes.

The author fails to represent the view of these opponents sufficiently to undermine them, so it loses its forcefulness on audiences familiar with their actual position.
Even if it’s a historic-theological work, designed to compare current aberrations with historic Christian affirmations: a basic justification and qualification of the (allegedly—but that’s for another day) Aristotelian framework he is using would put such a critique to rest. I hope the author revises the work to give us a baseline to go off of.

Well produce, high-quality recording. Reader has a pleasant and metered voice.

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  • Leonard II
  • 30-01-19

Romans 11:33-36

This is a must read for anyone even pondering who and what God is. God is God, and All That is In God, is God. Blessed be the name of the Lord!

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  • An Engineer
  • 24-11-18

a great look at an oft neglected Divine attribute

it's short enough I need to listen again to make sure I caught it all. a good cautionary to not lose sight of all that is in God

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  • YLB
  • 07-07-19

An absolute-must-read book!

James Dolezal has written a book dealing with an ongoing crisis within classical evangelicalism. This is a absolute-must-read for all true Christ-followers!

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  • Gl0b4l
  • 04-07-19

Excellent thought journey.

Our body is where we do, not who we are;
the Universe is God's body?

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  • mahlon smith
  • 13-06-19

A great book for thinking more deeply about God

I found the discussion about the latest trends in the doctrine of God quite illuminating. I better grasp what is at stake in the discussions between Divine mutualists and Classical theistic thinkers.