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Publisher's Summary

As a long-dormant volcano rumbles in the distance, a family crisis brings an unlikely couple into an unexpected partnership. 

A brainy - and perpetually single - volcanologist, Annie Tagama works alongside her father at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. But despite her pedigree, Annie has lost her passion for volcanology. She's quietly grieving the mysterious loss of her brother in the Middle East. When Annie discovers that her brother might still be alive - and in trouble - she shakes off her malaise and joins forces with Mano Oana, the unnervingly handsome family friend she had always blamed for her brother's death. 

As Annie and Mano investigate - and find that they have a lot more in common than tragedy - an evil force gathers strength on the main island. An ancient cult has reemerged - and Annie's little sister is somehow involved. As the old religion bubbles to the surface like lava, the old practices are not far behind...including human sacrifice.

Can Annie and Mano find her brother and save her family from destruction? Or will the ancient evil smother them all in an earth-shattering eruption?

©2014 Colleen Coble (P)2020 Recorded Books

What listeners say about Black Sands

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Michela
  • 09-08-20

Good! character/story needed a bit more spice

I liked the book but it didn’t hold my attention like the first one. Of course I listened to it somewhat sporadically! Annie’s character could have been spiced up a little. She was described in such a way that you half wondered how the male main character did fall in love with her- but at the same time I realize the author was describing an oppressed person learning to find herself. Overall, a good book. I’d pry listen to it again.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Paulette
  • 11-12-20

Too Many Mahalos

I enjoyed listening to this book as I did the previous book. I did get annoyed at the too many mahalos said that was not realistic. For one thing, Annie is Japanese. She would not be growing up speaking Hawaiian in her family. She would be using more Japanese words and phrases. In the first book, the story was of Kaia and her family, who was of Hawaiian blood and her grandfather raised them with the Hawaiian culture of her ancestors, using the Hawaiian language and customs. Annie’s father was from Japan and her mother was a Japanese born in Hawaii. They would not say mahalo to their family and friends. Hawaii is made up of multi-racial people. The common language is English, even if it’s pidgeon. Mahalo is used a little more formally, in writing, or to a group of people, to strangers, or casual acquaintances but not to intimate family and friends. Annie would not have said, “I am Hawaiian.” It would be saying she was of Hawaiian blood. We call ourselves “locals.” But I do understand what Annie was saying. We do have a strong pride of being the people of Hawaii. WE ARE HAWAII! Colleen Coble did excellent research of Hawaiian historical culture; and her story involving volcanology was so informative and I could picture the lava fields as she described them. But the Hawaiian historical culture and the Hawaiian people culture are connected but different. Colleen Coble was right on on the historical culture but not on the people culture. Under the umbrella of the Hawaiian culture are sub-cultures by islands and races. The story held my interest but I guessed who was behind the problem half way through the book. I still enjoyed finishing the book. Rachel Botchan was easy to listen to, though I had to speed up her speaking. She did put the emphasis on the wrong syllable on a few of the Hawaiian names that I almost didn’t recognize them but she did well over all. I gave four stars, even though it was a great book, because of the over usage of the word mahalo and incorrect cultural blending of the multi-racial families. I am looking forward to hearing the rest of the series because the books are great light mystery stories with an excellent Hawaiian historical cultural background that is written with quality and respect.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Patty
  • 24-11-20

black sands

the narrator sounded like a little kid. if I wanted a religious book I would have read my bible