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Publisher's Summary

The definitive guide to breastfeeding your baby

Breastfeeding may be natural, but it may also be more challenging than you expect. Some mothers encounter doubts and difficulties, from struggling with the first few feedings to finding a gentle and loving way to comfortably wean from the breast.

This second edition of Breastfeeding Made Simple is an essential guide to breastfeeding that every new and expectant mom should own - a comprehensive resource that takes the mystery out of basic breastfeeding dynamics. Understanding the seven natural laws of breastfeeding will help you avoid and overcome challenges such as low milk production, breast refusal, weaning difficulties, and every other obstacle that can keep you from enjoying breastfeeding your baby.

Breastfeeding Made Simple will help you to:

  • Find comfortable, relaxing breastfeeding positions
  • Establish ample milk production and a satisfying breastfeeding rhythm with your baby
  • Overcome discomfort and mastitis
  • Use a breast pump to express and store milk
  • Easily transition to solid foods  
©2010 Nancy Mohrbacher, Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, Jack Newman (P)2018 New Harbinger Publications

Critic Reviews

"I recommend this groundbreaking book to all my clients." (Diane Wiessinger, MS, IBCLC)

"I fell in love with this book; every page is a jewel. It simply ‘delivers’ what every mother needs - the natural laws to build a breastfeeding relationship. Understanding the first 40 days has changed the way I talk to new parents and teach breastfeeding supporters. Finally, here is a book that talks about breastfeeding without all the rules. This book lives in my bag to share with everyone!" (Carrie Finger, BFA, IBCLC, LCCE, Lactation Program Director at Aviva Institute) 

What listeners say about Breastfeeding Made Simple

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Kindle Customer
  • 01-05-19

A lot of information

I had hard time getting into and finishing this book. As an experienced breastfeeding mother and a Lactation educator this seems like a lot of information to be given to a new mom. It would seem overwhelming to try to comprehend and understand all the breastfeeding information given.

4 people found this helpful

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  • Andres Batista
  • 23-08-20

Helpful

This manual is so good, makes me realize I should have tried more medications prior to weaning and ones that didn’t cross into the milk.

2 people found this helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 29-05-20

informative

Definitely some good information. Very informative but lots of repetition. Worth listening to the audio book takes about a day to get through.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Jackie
  • 05-06-19

grating voice

I couldn't even get through the first chapter due to the readers voice hurting my ears. Every time she says a word with an S in is she whistles super high pitched and its awful. I bought the actual book and love the content however.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Emily
  • 02-08-21

Breastfeeding Made Judgmental

I had high hopes for this book and was quite disappointed. Primarily, I found it to be impractical, judgmental, flawed, and sometimes passive aggressive advice about breastfeeding. Particularly:
1) This book begins with providing a description of many of the claimed benefits from breastfeeding. One of the many examples of this is when it cites research, suggesting that breastfeeding has been shown to reduce obesity. This is a claim that has been shown to be correlated, but not causal. For instance - it is difficult to control for the education level and lifestyle of parents that choose breastfeeding versus formula in a research study. Many of these claimed benefits in this book are not supported by high-quality (large, peer-reviewed, randomized trial) causal research (breastfeeding CAUSES lower obesity rates versus breastfeeding is CORRELATED with lower obesity rates). For a more accurate examination of the benefits of breastfeeding (one of the largest of which is reduction in likelihood of breast cancer for the breastfeeding parent, and is mentioned only briefly in this book) I recommend the breastfeeding chapter in Cribsheet by Emily Oster
2) Many of the tips and advice in this book are impractical for anyone other than a breastfeeding person who chooses to stay at home (not work or not work full time). For example, the authors strongly condemn any advice that suggests getting a baby on a schedule, and don’t provide an alternative if this isn’t possible for a breastfeeding person. Many breastfeeding people are equal or even primary earners in modern families. Further, the United States has an abysmal maternity leave system. Without developing some form of schedule, many families are not able to breastfeed and return to work effectively. This lack of flexibility will result in more woman turning to formula.
3) This time spent on actual practical advice in this book is outweighed by focus on humans’ evolutionary roots, the natural state of breastfeeding in developing countries, and anthropological takes on breastfeeding. While this can be very interesting, the fact that humans are ape-descended “carry mammals” is not particularly useful in an advanced technological age and developed country where holding an infant a substantial part of the day may not be an option. Of course this is a desirable best case scenario, but without providing alternatives for breastfeeding people who may not have this option, it is not the “simple” information for a person looking for practical advice for breastfeeding success.
4) I found the tone of this book to be judgmental and passive aggressive in too many places. An example of this is the authors beginning a sentence with: “We feel sorry for the woman who (insert phrase reflecting a woman’s ignorance of something she is not an expert in)”. There is almost as much focus on what the old/conventional views on breastfeeding are and why they’re so dumb (my interpretation of the authors’ language) rather than what the right approaches should be.
5) The authors expressly state that they are switching back and forth each chapter using the traditional gender pronouns (he/she). This gives the appearance of equality and progressive views, but I found it odd (and antiquated) they didn’t merely choose they/them non-binary pronouns throughout.

Overall, I don’t recommend this book. I was disappointed with the tone, minimal alternatives, lack of alternatives and practical advice, and interpretation of research as causal rather than merely correlated.

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  • Kirsty
  • 05-09-19

Invaluable tool for mothers and their supporters

This is an excellent tool for all mothers, or those working with families, to guide to breastfeeding goals. The trouble shooting and myth busting is incredibly helpful for anyone battling with out of date approaches.