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Publisher's Summary

Brought to you by Penguin.

We live in the age of big companies where rising levels of power are concentrated in the hands of a few. Yet no government or organisation has the power to regulate these titans and hold them to account. We need big companies to share their power and we, the people of the world, need to reclaim it.

In Competition Is Killing Us, top business and competition lawyer Michelle Meagher establishes a new framework to control capitalism from the inside in order to make it work for the many and not just the few.

Meagher has spent years campaigning against these multi-billion- and trillion-dollar mammoths that dominate the market and prioritise shareholder profits over all else; leading to extreme wealth inequality, inhumane conditions for workers and relentless pressure on the environment.

In this revolutionary audiobook, she introduces her wholly achievable alternative; a fair and comprehensive competition law that limits unfair mergers, enforces accountability and redistributes power through stakeholder governance.

With an afterword by Simon Holmes, member of the UK 's Competition Appeal Tribunal, academic visitor at the Centre for Competition Law and Policy, Oxford University.

©2020 Michelle Meagher (P)2020 Penguin Audio

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  • Torrance Abell
  • 06-02-21

weak economics but some useful legal history.

Less a scholarly work than an advocacy document. Very weak economically, but good assessment of antitrust. it is clear she has a position, but if you are looking for an objective argument, look elsewhere.