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Publisher's Summary

A girl staying away from her family finds out that her grandmother is seriously unwell. She takes her scooter and rushes to her home. On the way, she recalls her memories of Dadi. When the girl reaches Dadi’s home, she finds her lying in a coffin. The next day, she feels the presence of Dadi in the house. This episode was written by Pooja Vrat Gupta.
©2019 Content Project (P)2019 Content Project

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SO PREDICTABLE! THIS IS MEDIOCRE STUFF

A very bad story ... and there are quite a few reasons for my saying so - first, the cliche climax which a listener could tell right from the start; second, a disgusting description of the post-death processes in the corpse (the writer went overboard - sickening descriptions); third, a squirrel being possessed by the departed - are you telling a story to the tiny tots who are yet to go to preparatory school or to genuine lovers of ghost tales? Come on, this is stupid stuff; fourth, bad plot errors - does the writer suggest that the disembodied spirit was sometimes possessing the body of a squirrel and sometimes floating free to fulfill her last wish - if the disembodied spirit was so powerful, it could have possessed a human for better interactions with the protagonist; fifthly, what is the relevance of the sighting of the spirit close to a temple toward the start of the story, it is an open end which the writer perhaps forgot to close. All together, the story is disgusting and deserves a ZERO. Neelesh Mishra's presentation is also quite ordinary. In any case, he couldn't have done much with a story as poor as this one. I suggest Pooja Vrat Gupta read a few classic ghost stories by the likes of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Kabiguru Rabindranath Tagore to acquaint herself with substantive stuff in this genre.