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Everybody Loves a Good Drought

Stories from India’s Poorest Districts
Written by: P. Sainath
Narrated by: Gaurav Marwa
Length: 14 hrs and 36 mins
5 out of 5 stars (3 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Acclaimed across the world, prescribed in over 100 universities and colleges, and included in part in The Century's Greatest Reportage (Ordfront, 2000), alongside the works of Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Studs Terkel, and John Reed, Everybody Loves a Good Drought is the established classic on rural poverty in India. Twenty years after publication, it remains unsurpassed in the scope and depth of reportage, providing an intimate view of the daily struggles of the poor and the efforts, often ludicrous, made to uplift them.

An illuminating introduction accompanying this 20-anniversary edition reveals, alarmingly, how a large section of India continues to suffer in the name of development so that a small percentage may prosper. Besides exposing chronic misgovernance, it is also a devastating comment on the media's failure to speak for the voiceless.

©2000 P. Sainath (P)2019 Random House Audio

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Such a powerhouse

This book provides an expansive insight into the processes of poverty from the ground without making a poster out of it. It fills a gap at assessment of India in a non text book fashion.
This could easily be one of the finest specimens of journalism.
More than two and a half decades after this was first published, this book remains relevant, as the agents of society remain much the same , albeit with newer complexities and far sophisticated social and technological interactions in place. I sincerely hope the author and those behind this, come up with a fresh 2020s revisit of the book as a some sort of sequel.

Also the narration is good.

Definitely recommended!