Get Your Free Audiobook

After 30 days, Audible is ₹199/mo. Cancel anytime.

OR

Publisher's Summary

In a rare attempt to understand the Indianness of Indians - among the most intelligent people in the world, but also, to a dispassionate eye, perhaps the most baffling - V. Raghunathan uses the props of game theory and behavioral economics to provide an insight into the difficult conundrum of why we are the way we are. He puts under the scanner our attitudes towards rationality and irrationality, selflessness and selfishness, competition and cooperation, and collaboration and deception.

Drawing examples from the way we behave in day-to-day situations, Games Indians Play tries to show how in the long run, each one of us - whether businessmen, politicians, bureaucrats, or just plain us - stand to profit more if we were to assume a little self-regulation, give fairness a chance, and strive to cooperate and collaborate a little more, even if self-interest were to be our main driving force.

©2008 V. Raghunathan (P)2019 Random House Audio

What listeners say about Games Indians Play

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

No Reviews are Available
Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Phil Tweed
  • 27-12-19

Bizarre Narration

I was really looking forward to listening to this book having worked across India for over 10 years, but the narration is so bizarre (monotone and with bizarre inflections) that the content is almost impenetrable.

I would suggest a recasting of the narrator to allow the subject matter an opportunity to be heard clearly.

A shame for the author, as the subject matter should be compelling.