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Going Dark

The Secret Social Lives of Extremists
Written by: Julia Ebner
Narrated by: Hera Reed
Length: 8 hrs and 43 mins

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Publisher's Summary

Bloomsbury presents Going Dark by Julia Ebner, read by Hera Reed.

"A scintillating journey into a secret world that is impacting our everyday lives in ways we are only just starting to grasp" (Peter Pomerantsev)

A Guardian and New Statesman Pick for 2020

By day, Julia Ebner works at a counter-extremism think tank, monitoring radical groups from the outside. But two years ago, she began to feel she was only seeing half the picture; she needed to get inside the groups to truly understand them. She decided to go undercover in her spare hours - late nights, holidays, weekends - adopting five different identities, and joining a dozen extremist groups from across the ideological spectrum. 

Her journey would take her from a Generation Identity global strategy meeting in a pub in Mayfair, to a Neo-Nazi Music Festival on the border of Germany and Poland. She would get relationship advice from ‘Trad Wives’ and Jihadi Brides and hacking lessons from ISIS. She was in the channels when the alt-right began planning the lethal Charlottesville rally, and spent time in the networks that would radicalise the Christchurch terrorist. 

In Going Dark, Ebner takes the reader on a deeply compulsive journey into the darkest recesses of extremist thinking, exposing how closely we are surrounded by their fanatical ideology every day, the changing nature and practice of these groups, and what is being done to counter them.

©2020 Julia Ebner (P)2020 Bloomsbury Publishing Plc

Critic Reviews

"Humanising, engrossing and alarming. Going Dark is not just an overdue, almost exhaustive journey of research into the lives of extremists, it is a public service." (Nesrine Malik) 

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  • Mr. T. P. Bedingfield
  • 04-03-20

Avoids religion too much

It was okay, it takes out the far right very well. But it stops short on most religious extremism. However, it it well written and well researched.

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 25-05-20

A gripping, depiction of today's extremism

A fantastic read which adds significant detail and new insight to an increasingly crowded genre of extremism studies. The diversity of extremism forms and modes covered and the links and commonalities between them is impressive. Ebner provides much needed sense-making of what from the outside looks like unstoppable chaos. She shows how we are all much closer to this than we imagine and have a careful role to play.

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  • papapownall
  • 10-04-20

Brave story of infiltration of extremist worlds

Julia Ebner is an incredibly brave journalist. In this book she tells the story of how she infiltrated the dangerous worlds of political extremists to tell the inside story of how they recruit, subvert and operate outside the mainstream. Some of the information included in this expose is truly shocking and demonstrates the lengths some of these people will go to attain their political goals. Many of the people the Ebner meets are, at fave value, surprisingly normal, albeit at the edge of society and all seem to want to connect with like minded people who are similarly disillusioned with the mainstream and are hankering for a common identity and a sense of belonging. We meet various right wing extremist groups including people at a rock concern in eastern Germany, an extremist dating site and, strangest of all proponents of the so-called Trade Wives movement who are anti-feminist. The stories have a little of "Louis Theroux" about them but they are more than that as Ebner is able to get deeper inside some of these organisations to discover who controls and drives them. This makes compulsive listening.