Get Your Free Audiobook

Listen with Audible free trial

₹199.00/month

1 credit a month to use on any title to download and keep
Listen to anything from the Plus Catalogue—thousands of Audible Originals, podcasts and audiobooks
Download titles to your library and listen offline
₹199 per month after 30-day trial. Cancel anytime.

Publisher's Summary

What can prosperity possibly mean in a world of environmental and social limits?

The publication of Prosperity Without Growth was a landmark in the sustainability debate. Tim Jackson’s piercing challenge to conventional economics openly questioned the most highly prized goal of politicians and economists alike: the continued pursuit of exponential economic growth. Its findings provoked controversy, inspired debate and led to a new wave of research building on its arguments and conclusions.

This substantially revised and re-written edition updates those arguments and considerably expands upon them. Jackson demonstrates that building a ‘post-growth’ economy is a precise, definable and meaningful task. Starting from clear first principles, he sets out the dimensions of that task: the nature of enterprise; the quality of our working lives; the structure of investment; and the role of the money supply. He shows how the economy of tomorrow may be transformed in ways that protect employment, facilitate social investment, reduce inequality and deliver both ecological and financial stability.

Seven years after it was first published, Prosperity Without Growth is no longer a radical narrative whispered by a marginal fringe, but an essential vision of social progress in a post-crisis world. Fulfilling that vision is simply the most urgent task of our times.

©2016 Tim Jackson (P)2020 Taylor & Francis

More from the same

What listeners say about Prosperity Without Growth

Average Customer Ratings

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

No Reviews are Available
Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Guy
  • 16-06-21

A powerful vision: but how to achieve it?

I found this to be an extremely interesting book. Tim Jackson is erudite and highly knowledgeable, but the style is cheerfully approachable, and Quentin Cooper reads well. The text is well-structured, well-evidenced, extremely well-argued. In my view, most of what he says is pretty much incontrovertible, and I won't repeat it here: read the blurb, read the book. My main critique relates to his dogged optimism. To a degree, I get that: an optimistic vision can perhaps change hearts and minds. But that also leads him, in my view, to sidestep some of the fundamental challenges to achieving the new social/economic model he proposes. His (wonderful) vision is of a world with less stuff but higher quality of life, within an equitable and ecologically sustainable political framework. But achieving that would require nothing short of an ideological revolution, and radical social choices about what we could live without: the more expensive elements of modern healthcare, for example? A no-growth prosperity is not business-as-usual with organic vegetables and slightly fewer shirts: it's about DRAMATIC reduction in our resource consumption. It's a world I'd like to live in, and I agree with Jackson that it's technologically, economically and psychologically possible (not to mention necessary). But politically, how on earth can we achieve it, faced with the overwhelming power of corporate capitalism to drive continued consumerism and to favour the election of growth-fixated (and often corrupt) political leaders? Jackson doesn't seem to provide a clear and convincing answer to this question. Perhaps he's right: perhaps the reasoned presentation of a way forward is enough, people will come round to it, because they're not stupid. Only, we are stupid. Or at any rate, trapped in a hopeless dilemma of the commons.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Kindle Customer
  • 08-01-21

Will require a second (and third) listening

I understood about a quarter of this book. There is a lot of detail, and many economic concepts which were new to me. It is well written, just dense. The narrator has a slightly squeaky voice.

I come at the subject reluctantly from the perspective of someone who is actively seeking to learn about the climate crisis, having realised that to understand the topic also entails some understanding of economics.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Antony
  • 18-09-21

Interesting read, but flawed thesis.

There's loads of interesting information here, but in the end, it's just a string of excuses for a new kind of socialism verging on communism.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • S Longman
  • 11-09-21

Brilliant

Very well written and clearly thought out logical arguments to support a realistic alternative to consumption driven growth. A must read for anyone concerned about the climate and ecological crisis.