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Publisher's Summary

What I wanted more than anything was to be standing beside Schmidt, in concert with Schmidt, at the foot of Saint Sebastian’s Abyss along with Schmidt, hands cupped to the sides of our faces, debating art, transcendence, and the glory of the apocalypse.” Former best friends who built their careers writing about a single work of art meet after a decades-long falling-out. One of them, called to the other’s deathbed for unknown reasons by a “relatively short” nine-page email, spends his flight to Berlin reflecting on Dutch Renaissance painter Count Hugo Beckenbauer and his masterpiece, Saint Sebastian’s Abyss, the work that established both men as important art critics and also destroyed their relationship. A darkly comic meditation on art, obsession, and the enigmatic power of friendship, Saint Sebastian’s Abyss stalks the museum halls of Europe, feverishly seeking salvation, annihilation, and the meaning of belief.

©2022 Mark Haber (P)2022 Recorded Books

What listeners say about Saint Sebastian's Abyss

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    3 out of 5 stars
  • Debbie Ann
  • 16-07-22

Amusing

I purchased this on a whim because as a child in Catholic school I was obsessed with St Sebastian. This book has little to do with him! The superficial story regards 2 men who share a lifelong friendship and obsession with a work of art. On a deeper level, it’s a satire on academia, art criticism, and intellectuals. It is a bit repetitive and a bit pompous; both of these qualities are part of the point and I was not annoyed by these. The reader sets the perfect tone. I found it funny and interesting. It’s the perfect length.