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Publisher's Summary

From the best-selling author of Karna's Wife comes this book about Urmila, Sita's sister and the neglected wife of Lakshman, and one of the most overlooked characters in the Ramayana.

As Sita prepares to go into exile, her younger sisters stay back at the doomed palace of Ayodhya, their smiles, hope and joy wiped away in a single stroke. And through the tears and the tragedy one woman of immense strength and conviction stands apart - Urmila, whose husband, Lakshman, has chosen to accompany his brother Ram to the forest rather than stay with his bride. She could have insisted on joining Lakshman, as did Sita with Ram. But she did not. Why did she agree to be left behind in the palace, waiting for her husband for 14 painfully long years?

©2014 Kavita Kané (P)2016 Audible, Inc.

What listeners say about Sita's Sister

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untouched aspect of ramayana

our history is enriched with warriors and women are no less than anyone else its just they are often less spoken less written..Mesmerizing writing by kavita kane

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Seeta’s Sister - A Book Review

A book review: 'Sita's Sister' by Kavita Kane
'Sita's Sister' and 'Karna's Wife' (2014), followed by "Menaka's Choice' (2015) and later 'The Fisher Queen's Dynasty' and 'Lanka's Princess' (2017), Kavita Kane gave readers women from Indian mythology; 'Ahalya's Awakening' being the final one in 2020. All of these are on my reading list now.
'Sita's Sister' is none else but Urmila, the daughter of King Janak and Queen Sunaina. She is the first-born of the couple; Sita, the elder of the two, being the foundling. Yet, Urmila never gets the title of the princess.
'The value of a moment gone and lived often lies in the strength of its memory,' says Urmila. She lives an extraordinary and eventful life leaving no place for pity. She carves her niche in the palace of Ayodhya after Lakshman departs for the 14-year exile. While Ram and Lakshman fight the war against Ravan, Urmila fought her battles around wishes, fate, patience, hatred and prayers in the palace and she is a clear winner here.
Kavita Kane brings out a Urmila who is a scholar of theology, an able administrator, a calm and poised queen, a skilled painter, an adoring wife, a forgiving daughter-in-law, a mature daughter and most impressively, the Urmila, who stands for herself and her sisters.
Kavita's Urmila meets us as a woman of substance when she questions the intellectuals of Ayodhya as to what a man's dharma is towards his mother and wife. Her Urmila has no resentment or bitterness though she is the one who suffers the most of her sisters.
She is a radical thinker. She is Ram's outspoken critic for sending a pregnant Sita to the forest and choosing his country and people over his wife. She asks why does Ram not address his people directly than making his wife walk through the scorching flames to prove her chastity.
An amazing Urmila leaves the reader in a daze.
In the end, I wished to know what becomes of our Urmila and her sisters. All we get to know is about the menfolk of Ayodhya. Can the author tell us?

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  • Divya Rangi
  • 18-01-17

A good book with a Not too good narration

Any additional comments?

Narrator has time and again pronounced the names wrong and changed names (eg: mandvi as madhvi). It was really irritating but other than that her narration was good.

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  • Reader
  • 09-01-17

Good

I picked this up at the airport thinking it will be like Divakaruni's "The Palace of Illusions". But it is not. Somehow it felt superficial. The romance between Lakshman and Urmila could have been better. It is a good read albeit not as poetic as Chitra.