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Publisher's Summary

Can one of the most divided nations on the planet become its next superpower? James Crabtree reveals the titans of politics and industry shaping India in a period of breakneck change from controversial prime minister Narendra Modi, victor in the largest election in history, to the leading lights of the country's burgeoning billionaire class.

While King of the Good Times Vijay Mallya languishes in exile in Britain, other major Bollygarchs prosper at home despite a series of scandals. Issuing jewel-encrusted invitations to their children's weddings, these tycoons exert huge power in both business and politics.

But India's explosive economic rise has driven inequality to new extremes. Millions remain trapped in slums and corruption is endemic. Reformers fight to wrest the nation from these dark forces, leaving its fate poised between that of a prosperous democratic giant and a saffron-tinged version of Russia.

©2018 James Crabtree (P)2020 Audible, Ltd

What listeners say about The Billionaire Raj

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Narration has multiple issues

Right now, after one listen, the only problems I have are with the narrator. He uses an offensive Apu-like made up accent to narrate statements of all Indians included in the book (including Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen). I see it as an abhorrent act of racism veiled under the guise of catering to the Western audience.

Second, he mispronounces many Indian names, to make them sound familiar to the Western audience. It should not be difficult for him to actually get the pronunciation right, considering he himself seems to be an Indian.

4 people found this helpful

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The Problem is with the narration

The narration has serious racial overtones as the narrator changes his voice to what he thinks is an Indian accent every time he is quoting someone of Indian descent. This should not be accepted and is something audible should make sure doesn't happen again. There is no need for accents, the narrator can just recite the book as it. There are also several spaces where the narrator mispronounces names, Indian words, and Indian space. A little research into those pronunciations could have fixed that very easily. Goes to show how little an international company tries to not make its content racist.

1 person found this helpful

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A glimpse of wide disparity in Indian society

The book well explains why India has remained poor despite her talented citizens. Its political clout which helps a person prosper and progress. Political clout is based on money power. Probity, honesty does not count much in politics. A good read. Would recommend others to read. In one book the listener gets to know the Rich, Well-off and corrupt politicians