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  • The Far Field

  • A Novel
  • Written by: Madhuri Vijay
  • Narrated by: Sneha Mathan
  • Length: 14 hrs
  • 4.2 out of 5 stars (88 ratings)

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The Far Field cover art

The Far Field

Written by: Madhuri Vijay
Narrated by: Sneha Mathan
Free with 30-day trial

₹199 per month after 30-day trial. Cancel anytime.

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Publisher's Summary

In the wake of her mother's death, Shalini, a privileged and restless young woman from Bangalore, sets out for a remote Himalayan village in the troubled northern region of Kashmir. Certain that the loss of her mother is somehow connected to the decade-old disappearance of Bashir Ahmed, a charming Kashmiri salesman who frequented her childhood home, she is determined to confront him. But upon her arrival, Shalini is brought face to face with Kashmir's politics, as well as the tangled history of the local family that takes her in. And when life in the village turns volatile and old hatreds threaten to erupt into violence, Shalini finds herself forced to make a series of choices that could hold dangerous repercussions for the very people she has come to love.

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Critic Reviews

“Remarkable...an engrossing narrative.... Vijay’s stunning debut novel expertly intertwines the personal and political to pick apart the history of Jammu and Kashmir.” (Publishers Weekly)

What listeners say about The Far Field

Average Customer Ratings
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Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

A mature tale of finding oneself

A thought provoking book, I eased through the book without a struggle. I could feel Shalini's emotions through her journey. The realization that life has its ups and downs and sometimes things are just beyond our control. Loved the narrator's work too. She did a splendid job with perfect pronunciations and modulations. I'd love to listen to another book by her.

1 person found this helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Young girl in Kashmir!

A lively narrative of a young troubled girl about her relationship with the headstrong mother and loving but aloof father - weaved through the lives of Kashmiris in Kishtwar. Loved the style of writing by the author and how she has managed to bring alive the characters and their emotional selves. Did feel that some extensions of relationships seemed stretched. But all in all a good read - Audible experience was brilliant too.

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

A story that tugs at your heart strings!

A seemingly implausible plot woven around strong character portrayals.There are times when you want to shake the flawed and self destructive protagonist to make her come to senses. But then you do understand why she's what she is and can't help loving her. Great novel by a debutant and a narration that has made this jewel shine.

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    1 out of 5 stars
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Fake and negative .

I was really surprised to read this fiction. Such an one sided narrative. Written only to put Indian army in Kashmir in a very bad light. A negative , unrealistic and fake story, which was weird from beginning! Not wanted to give even an one star.

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Sneha Manthan brings alive the story!

A riveting story and the narrative keeps the listener hooked.

Sneha's voice modulation abd narrative style is one of the best that I've heard. I have listened to many audio books and I would judge this book as one of the best in terms of delivery.

The story line builds up and thr author very brilliantly takes the reader through a series of emotions. In the end, I felt a range of emotions for the protagonist-this perhaps is an indicator of the genius of Madhuri Vijay.

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Slow paced

Tha narration was extremely good, that kept me going most of the times than the storyline.

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Story - Good & Interesting | Narration - Great

Narration by Sneha Mathan was great. I listened to the book during my daily walks and I had no problems following the story.

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Wonderful and Sobering

A story that needs to be read and told and thought of a million times over. Especially in the times we live in!

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won't recommend the book.

struggled to finish. didn't get the point at all. unnecessary description. Throughout the book you will find statements which are not linked or completely negating each other.

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a surprisingly bold story

this book doesn't maintain any pretence of being correct or indulging in the closure of a happy ending which for a debut novel is nothing short of courage. even though the book feels a bit tedious in the middle parts, the conclusion makes up for an overall good read.
the performance by Sneha Mathan is worth mentioning here.

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  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
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  • Amy Lanman
  • 08-06-19

Very morose

I would not have chosen to listen to this if I had an idea of how dark and sadly miserable it was going to be. The recap by others presented a different story. I made the choice by the reader's explanations and the ranking stars. I skipped through a lot of the story because it dragged on, was depressing and the storyline was not missed as I skipped forward to save myself from the burden of listening. It was predictable at every chapter, however, I was hopeful that the end would bring something inspiring to t light to redeem my continual thought of why was I bothering to listening. Not even at the end did it have a point, an important discovery by the main character, nor an interesting plot pulled together.
A sad and misguided girl that showed her cowardly decisions at every turn of the page, to the very last words. A family that had no inspiring direction.
The only positive comment is the author knows how to write a storyline and the narrator held my interest... if you like morose stories because your life feels better for hearing such negative opposites; well at least that is something.

92 people found this helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Joelle Trayers
  • 26-03-19

Expert Narration

This book is about the journey of a young woman named Shalani who deals with the grief of her mother's loss by trying to find a man she was very close to. The narrator for this tale is excellent. She expertly goes from voice to voice and made the story much more enjoyable.

57 people found this helpful

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  • Y
  • 07-04-19

Riveting interaction between mother and salesman

The earlier parts of the story in which the mother’s interactions with the clothing salesman and the rest of the world were described were spellbinding. The writing is excellent and the prose is wonderful and captivating. The latter part of the story wasn’t quite as interesting to me as the descriptions of the mother but still a hard to put down read. I really did like the mother and the daughter’s reaction to her ways and her actions.

54 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Deborah
  • 19-01-19

Enlightening

I love novels about the colorful, bittersweet culture of India. I was particularly fascinated by the truthfulness that Westerners never hear about the tumultuous state of Kashmir. The poverty and taking of innocents by the military in Kashmir is heart wrenching. The corruption of officials is appalling. The treatment of women in India is now surfacing. It is a third world nation struggling to gain a foothold in the 21st century but cannot seem to lose its hold on its pasts’ grip on poverty vs. wealth and modern technology. Not a glossy picture, but one that opens the listeners’ eyes.

41 people found this helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Malene E. Cavin
  • 21-02-19

great surprise

I stumbled upon this book purely by chance and I must confess that I loved it. I liked how it told the story from different perspectives and enlightening the world about a (to most of the world) little known conflict was a definite bonus.

16 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Terry Rusinow
  • 21-08-19

Wonderfully rich characters and story

I loved hearing this book. the characters were brought to life by the reader and I literally would listen for hours, not wanting it to end. This was no fairy tale with a happy ending, but a story of flawed humans living their lives.

3 people found this helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Anonymous User
  • 15-06-20

Addictive!

Something about the naiviete of the main character is charming whilst surprising . GREAT insight into rural Kashmir and the slightest hint of the turmoil facing the residents. I really enjoyed this book and raged at the end at the inhumanity facing the region

2 people found this helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • jon orourke
  • 16-12-19

Pretty good story and decent first effort

Because I'm interested the difficult troubles in Kashmir and because I traveled and worked in Kashmir in 2006 and 2009 and because I lived in New Delhi for 5 years in the 1990s, I chose to read listen to this first novel by Maduri Vijay about Kashmir ... a novel which was strongly recommended by various book outlets. In 2009 I also read Salman Rusdie's great novel about Kashmir "Shalimar the Clown". There is really no comparison; I consider "Shalimar the Clown" one of Russia's best, along with "The Moro's Last Sigh" . Rushdie's novel about Kashmir is ten times more mature, erudite and artistic literature than "The Far Field". Still ,"The Far Field"I is a pleasant engaging and interesting story. It honestly evokes the physical beauty of the area as well as the intense tensions and suspicions that permeate life in rural Kashmir.

2 people found this helpful

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  • A reader
  • 03-12-19

Slow

Lovely prose, usually. A bit overwrought at times. Sad tale of an over-privileged yet under-insightful woman’s naive and self-centered journey to unsuccessfully find meaning in a life paralyzed by an inability to engage. The latter possibly the result of growing up the only child of a bipolar, magnetic, domineering mother.

2 people found this helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Donna M.
  • 04-11-19

Good but frustrating

I found myself getting mad at the main character as she seemed so naive at every turn. The story also seemed to support the notion that there are no loving marriages. I do recommend this book but with some hesitation.

2 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Luce Briggi
  • 07-02-19

A beautiful and evocative tale

★★★★✰ 4.5 stars

The Far Field is an exceptional debut novel. Madhuri Vijay has written a quietly intense tale that both conjures and conveys feelings of uncertainty.

After her mother's death Shalini becomes detached from her daily existence. Increasingly alienated from others she makes the impulsive decision to travel to a remote Himalayan village in Kashmir where Bashir Ahmed —an old friend of her mother's— lives.
In an interview Vijay describes Shalini as being "remote and closed-off, so hamstrung by doubt and suspicion, that even [she], as the writer, occasionally felt suffocated by her voice". Well, I agree 100% with her. Shalini is a cypher. She is hesitant to demonstrate her feelings or to simply share her thoughts with the people who could potentially become her friends. Vijay has depicted her in this way quite intentionally. To me, Shalini's inability to act was yes frustrating but it also created tension. Would she finally unwind? Could she be able to really live in the present? Connect with others?

Her journey does not follow the classic 'coming of age' that often occurs in similar novels (where a character travels somewhere to 'find themselves' or to come 'to terms with their past). Shalini's experiences in Kashmir are far more realistic. An ingrained distrust still dictates a lot of what she does. I was really saddened and frustrated by her half-hearted attempt at a friendship with Zoya and Amina. Shalini seems desperate to fill in the hole left by her mother's death but she is also very reticent about revealing her innermost self.
Shalini was also utterly naive and rather self-centred. The few times she actually 'acts' or says something important she usually ends up doing or saying the wrong thing. She seems unable to read other people or to take in account what they too might be hiding/protecting their true emotions.
Given that Shalini is recounting her journey to Kashmir years after it, she often expresses the wish to have acted differently, and there are a lot of 'if onlys' which furthered the tension of her story.
Having lived a life of comfort Shalini doesn't seem to realise that not everyone knows those same comforts (which she has taken for granted).
There are chapters that focus on Shalini's childhood and on her intense relationship with her fiery mother. It is perhaps because she is so young (and sheltered) that Shalini does not notice how trapped and unhappy her seemingly strong mother was. Their strained relationship takes its toll on both mother and daughter.

This novel depicts Shalini's desperate attempts to belong and to reconcile herself with the way in which she treated (and was in turn treated by) her mother. Sadly, Shalini often acts under the wrong impression, and she either misunderstands others and or ends up being misunderstood by the ones she claims she cares for.
Vijay renders the way in which language can betray one's intention or the way in which words often are not often.
This novel has a lot to wrestle with but it does so in a paced manner. This story is one of ambivalence and dissolution; the plot rests on the novel's setting(s) and on Shalini's interactions with mainly two other families. While the author does not shy away from portraying the religious conflict occurring in Kashmir, she focuses more on the experiences of various individual characters — the way in which they themselves are affected by dispute between India and Pakistan — rather than offering a dumbed down 'overview' of Kashmir's long history of violence. Having Shalini as the narrator allows readers to glimpse Kashmir through the eyes of an 'outsider'.

This is a story about privilege, guilt, grief, and isolation. Amidst the novel's bleak realism there are some heart-rendering moments, and Vijay's writing lyrical writing often allowed me to forget of the unease created by her story. I kept hoping against hope that the ending would provide some sort of not quite magical solution but that it could at least give me some closure...but I'm afraid to say that the ending is what makes this a 4 star read rather than a 5 one. WHY?!

Anyhow, I will definitely keep my eyes open for more of Vijay's stunning and heartbreaking writing.

PS: The audiobook which was narrated by Sneha Mathan who does an incredible job. Her voice is 1)beautiful 2)capable of making me feel a wide range of emotions 3)simply captivating

1 person found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Jo T
  • 08-08-20

Thought provoking & compelling

Well worth a read. A personal journey which draws you into the main character's relationship with her mother as well as her country, its politics and rich poor vs gender opportunities and constraints.