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The Five

The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper
Written by: Hallie Rubenhold
Narrated by: Louise Brealey
Length: 10 hrs and 20 mins
Regular price: ₹1,328.00
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Publisher's Summary

Five devastating human stories and a dark and moving portrait of Victorian London - the untold lives of the women killed by Jack the Ripper.  

Polly, Annie, Elizabeth, Catherine and Mary-Jane are famous for the same thing, though they never met. They came from Fleet Street, Knightsbridge, Wolverhampton, Sweden and Wales. They wrote ballads, ran coffeehouses and lived on country estates; they breathed ink dust from printing presses and escaped people traffickers.  

What they had in common was the year of their murders: 1888. The person responsible was never identified, but the character created by the press to fill that gap has become far more famous than any of these five women.  

For more than a century, newspapers have been keen to tell us that ‘the Ripper’ preyed on prostitutes. Not only is this untrue, as historian Hallie Rubenhold has discovered, it has prevented the real stories of these fascinating women from being told. Now, in this devastating narrative of five lives, Rubenhold finally sets the record straight, revealing a world not just of Dickens and Queen Victoria but of poverty, homelessness and rampant misogyny. They died because they were in the wrong place at the wrong time - but their greatest misfortune was to be born a woman.

©2019 Hallie Rubenhold (P)2019 Bolinda Publishing Pty Ltd

What members say

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  • Kindle Customer
  • 18-05-19

The story you think you know, but don't.

Turn history on its head. The women each have unique histories and what I thought I knew about them was mostly false. Amazing research has gone into this book. The stories are brilliantly written and the narrator is compelling.

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  • Debrakluit
  • 24-04-19

Excellent and Emotional

Excellent research work of these five women and an emotional review of a woman's life in the 19th century

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 01-03-19

Brilliant

Absolutely loved this. The lives of the women are so incredibly interesting, and significantly more so than anything I have read about their killer. Would highly recommend!!

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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  • Mr Scott Doutre
  • 10-03-19

Fantastic Book

This is such a fantastic book, the story being told is one that everyone needs to know.
It is written in such a way that you can imagine living and breathing in Victorian London on every page.
I will be highly recommending

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Katharine Richards
  • 28-02-19

Superb

Can’t recommend this highly enough. The factual telling of the stories of these women’s lives and their humanity with such respect, treating them with the dignity they always deserved but, until now, had been denied. A really moving, layered, powerful book. ‬

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Jock
  • 19-04-19

An Insight in to the lives of the poorest women

I downloaded this book with a low expectation, having seen the reviews of some who had been very critical. However from the first moment, I was mesmerised in to a world I knew little about. A world of utter desperation, and hopelessness. A world familiar to the poorest in Victorian society.

The research here is simply astonishing, and the way in which lives have been revived and the tragedy of their tales is breath-taking. Yes there is speculation, and hypotheticals, but these are based on evidence and comparators.

In the course of the book I stopped seeing these canonical five as victims, and began seeing them as women. Women who had been abused, degraded and disposed, both by the Victorians and by contemporary writers ever since. I do doubt these women were prostitutes, but why should that matter - no one should have there life cut short regardless of where one works.

But we continue to abuse these women to this day, in how we think of them, how our language describes them, and who is remembered.

The narration is beautiful, the writing is strong, the story is compelling, but most of all my perspective was changed.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Georgina Spencer
  • 17-04-19

Long overdue

An incredible and long overdue telling of these women we only know as victims. At times I wanted to walk away from this book, so tragic are the stories. I’m so glad I didn’t.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Squeaky Joe
  • 08-05-19

Provocative and thoroughly absorbing

Famous for nothing more than being victims of Jack the Ripper, the reputations of five women have for years been tarnished by claims that they were simply prostitutes, sex workers who led selfish, pointless lives. But in truth, their stories have never been told. Now, Hallie Rubenhold uncovers the real lives of Polly, Annie, Elizabeth, Catherine and Mary-Jane and reveals how they came from a variety of backgrounds and geographical locations, including Fleet Street, Wolverhampton, Sweden and Wales. They wrote songs, owned coffee houses, lived on country estates and escaped the perils and demands of people-traffickers. They were mothers, sisters, daughters and wives whose only crimes were to fall prey to poverty and desperation.

Ever since the name of Jack the Ripper was first coined, that infamous being has reigned supreme in countless books, movies, documentaries and even tours of the murder sites. Concentrating on the grisly murders, everyone wants to know about the possible motives, the failings of the police investigation and the ever-growing list of possible suspects. It seems ridiculous that, until now, few historians have gone to the trouble of exploring the lives of the five women who made the Ripper famous.

Hallie Rubenhold has a gift for meticulous research and in this fascinating account, she brings to life the real women whose lives ended between August and November 1888. The author’s circumspect approach brings the women and the era alive and highlights that it was not prostitution but poverty, alcohol and tragedy that led them to their sudden and unwarranted deaths.

A provocative and thoroughly absorbing book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 26-04-19

Entertaining, educational and eye opening

I loved learning about the the real women behind the caricatures of the rippers victims. All we know is they happen to be the unfortunate women murdered by the most famous killer in history. They have been forgotten over time as the legend of 'Jack' has grown. In this book we can see them as wives, mothers, lovers, victims of society as much as of Jack the ripper, real women with real stories. There has clearly been a great deal of research done into the lives of these five women and I also found it a great social history lesson. The narration was very good as was the structure of the book telling each woman's individual story from beginning to end. This was a great listen and I feel grateful to have learned about these real, colourful, strong yet flawed women behind the myth.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • N. Reid
  • 25-04-19

Well researched<br />

Much better angle for the common story of violence against women. Very well researched and interesting throughout.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Mr Colin T Gills
  • 17-04-19

Heartbreaking.

A necessary story, beautifully written and performed. For anyone with even a shred of empathy, "The Five" drops us into a world of gut-twisting poverty and shuddering injustice, where women are both heroines and victims. It's a moving story of fragile lives, always a couple of misfortunes away from catastrophe. Well worth the read.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • R. J. Gladden
  • 14-04-19

The real women behind the tragedy

This is the remarkable story of the women behind the Victorian murders. We’ve seen their faces and the death masks but now we get to glimpse the lives and characters of this appalling tragedy and the lives ruined by a system who cared little for those on the margins of society.

The parallels with the murders of Peter Sutcliffe and the similar language used to segregate the women between “respectable” and “morally loose” the latter (who, presumably, deserved their fate) is obvious. Thank you Hallie Rubenhold for showing us the real women behind the headlines.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful