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Publisher's Summary

Brought to you by Penguin.

From the best-selling author of Fool's Gold

To understand business, you need to think like an anthropologist.

Is your workplace riven by tribal conflict? Are your meetings governed by dozens of unspoken rituals? Is there something faintly religious about the way your colleagues worship the CEO?

If so, then you might need a lesson in business anthropology. For a century, anthropologists have had an unusual method: immersing themselves deep inside 'alien' tribes and uncovering, from the inside, how they tick. Today, a new generation of anthropologists are using this approach to explain modern businesses - revealing the hidden rituals that define what we buy, who we sell to and how we work.

Now, best-selling author Gillian Tett reveals how this new wave of anthropology can help make sense of your business. She shows how thinking like an anthropologist can help you navigate a globalised economy, allowing you to get inside the heads of consumers on the other side of the world. And she argues that anthropology can explain your own workplace, too: by revealing why, say, your IT team seem to have such different priorities to you - or how to alter the behavioural patterns of your most perplexing colleagues.

Along the way, Tett draws on extraordinary stories from Tajik villages and Amazon warehouses, Japanese classrooms and Wall Street trading floors - all to reveal how you, too, can think like an anthropologist.

The result is a revelatory new way to view global business. In a short-sighted world, we can all learn to see clearly - using the power of Anthro-Vision.

©2021 Gillian Tett (P)2021 Penguin Audio

What listeners say about Anthro-Vision

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Very interesting, informative and insightful.

Loved it. Very beautifully presented. Very interesting, informative and insightful. Recommend this to all .

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  • Roberto Guidetti
  • 26-06-21

Insightful and stimulating

A journey with real examples connecting times and sectors on the critical importance of widening our lenses to see the webs of meaning and culture that we normally miss. Gillian Tett is a great journalist, this book also explains her ability to anticipate insights thanks to her background in anthropology.

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  • Leslye Rost van Tonningen
  • 23-06-21

Great topic, terrible narrator

Got this book because I listened to a great interview with the author. Unfortunately the narrator is terrible…would be great for a work of fiction but her attempts to insert ‘personality’ makes the book hard to listen to…can’t seem to make it past the first chapter.

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  • Megan
  • 21-06-21

Book worth reading but be prepared to grit your teeth through the performance

I want to mention the performance first. At first I thought the reader was excellent. She reads slowly with a lot of expression. Then I began to enjoy her narration less. Her slow reading and emphasis started to feel insulting or to express values which I did not share.

Take for example her sarcastic emphasis on doctors helping with the Ebola crisis in Sierra Leone as “experts”. The sarcasm arises because they weren’t taking anthropology into account. (Now, it may be that the sarcastic quotes around the word expert also exists in Tett’s book, in which case the reader is faithfully reproducing that emphasis, in which case the actual blame lies with the author .) But even if the doctors were not culturally sensitive, they are still experts in improving people’s health. So I found this sort of emphasis grating.

The reader would be ideal for reading books designed to fuel outrage. Or poetry readings. But perhaps less so factual books. If you feel the need to try to make the statement that the area of a circle is pi times r squared sound like a diatribe, maybe change your genre?

The book is quite good, and the content is not challenging at all, with one big idea per chapter. It did get me thinking about the parallels between the behaviour of us supposedly highly educated people in the West and the perhaps less well educated Sierra Leonians. We are not so different. Having said that, the author may be suggesting at times that there is no such thing as objective truth. That is sheer folly.

The book is worth reading.



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  • Roberta McDonnell
  • 22-07-21

Fantastically insightful and beautifully timely

Anthropology’s power to generate deep understandings of complex human issues, and to recommend workable solutions, comes of age in this tremendous book.

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  • Andrei Olteanu
  • 21-07-21

Great listen if you're not looking for the science

Although I'm not a professional in anthropology, I think the book lacks substance. It's just a collection of memories in different fields and walks of life. The author tries to connect them with the field of anthropology, but it does not feel rigorous or scientific at all.
However, the performance of the reader is astonishing. She knows when to stress some parts and adapts her intonation magnificently.
All this makes it a great listen, but only if you're not here for the theory behind it.

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  • Salman
  • 05-07-21

An eye opener

Never thought much of anthropology much before this book. Engaging and refreshing narrative. The narrator is great to listen to.

2 people found this helpful