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Armadale

Written by: Wilkie Collins
Length: 30 hrs and 2 mins

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Publisher's Summary

Two young men linked by a familial murder mystery, a beautiful yet wicked governess who spins a web of deceit, and five individuals named Allan Armadale

Wilkie Collins' follow-up to The Woman in White and No Name is an innovative take on mistaken identity, the nature of evil, and the dark underbelly of Victorian England. The story concerns two distant cousins, both named Allan Armadale, and the impact of a family tragedy, which makes one of them a target of the murderous Lydia Gwilt, a vicious and malevolent charmer determined to get her hands on the Armadale fortune. Will the real Allan Armadale be revealed, and will he survive the plot against his life?

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Public Domain (P)2020 Naxos Audiobooks

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  • Simon Brodie
  • 12-04-20

Classic Collins

This is the third of Wilkie Collins’s four great novels of the 1860s, the others being The Woman in White, No Name, and The Moonstone. The lives of two cousins, both named Allan Armadale, seem inextricably wound together. Is it fate or merely chance? One of the cousins is unaware of their kinship; the other goes by an assumed name and is haunted by a crime committed by his late father. The narrative is increasingly dominated by a third character, the beautiful but deceitful Lydia Gwilt, whose schemes threaten the life of one or both of the cousins. Armadale is a melodrama in the best sense of the word, and the Naxos cast is splendid!

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  • TX lilbit
  • 21-03-20

When authors are paid by the word

Victorian writers' novels were often originally published as serials to boost newspaper/periodical sales. This system birthed some of the greatest English language books ever - and some not so great. I really enjoyed Wilkie Collins' 'The Lady in White' and 'The Moonstone,' but this book definitely screams 'paid by the word.' Maybe 'paid by the pound.' For every idea, interaction or set piece that moves the plot forward, there are 5 that are painfully and pointlessly drawn out almost beyond belief. If the author wrote "she drew a breath and then spoke" before each sentence it wouldn't be out of step with the pacing.

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  • Penelope
  • 16-05-20

30+ Hours Well Spent

I am very grateful for the experience of this story, more of a play than a reading and recommend it highly to all Wilkie Collins fans. If you're new to Wilkie Collins, I'd recommend it to you if you are a Jane Austin fan. (If you're new to Jane Austin then I'd recommend her to you if you have a beating heart.)
My deepest compliments and thanks to the superb cast and of course my undying gratitude and respect to Mr Wilkie Collins.