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Publisher's Summary

One of Amazon's Best Romances of the Month!

For fans of You’ve Got Mail, a young woman juggles pursuing her dream job in radio while helping her family compete with the new halal restaurant across the street, in this sparkling new rom-com by the author of Ayesha at Last

Sales are slow at Three Sisters Biryani Poutine, the only halal restaurant in the close-knit Golden Crescent neighborhood of Toronto. Hana waitresses there part time, but what she really wants is to tell stories on the radio. If she can just outshine her fellow intern at the city radio station, she may have a chance at landing a job. In the meantime, Hana pours her thoughts and dreams into a podcast, where she forms a lively relationship with one of her listeners. But soon she'll need all the support she can get: A new competing restaurant, a more upscale halal place, is about to open in the Golden Crescent, threatening her mother’s restaurant.

When her mysterious aunt and her teenage cousin arrive from India for a surprise visit, they draw Hana into a long-buried family secret. A hate-motivated attack on their neighborhood complicates the situation further, as does Hana's growing attraction for Aydin, the young owner of the rival restaurant - who might not be a complete stranger after all.

As life on the Golden Crescent unravels, Hana must learn to use her voice, draw on the strength of her community and decide what her future should be.

©2021 Uzma Jalaluddin (P)2021 Penguin Audio

Critic Reviews

"Cute, emotional, and ultimately joyful. A romance with a warm heart, one wrapped in the bonds of family and friendship, this book left me with a delighted smile on my face." (Nalini Singh, New York Times best-selling author)

"The clever and independent protagonist, large cast of vivid characters, strong family ties, and satisfying enemies-to-lovers trope all have the feel of a classic remake and will thoroughly delight readers looking for modern Indian-Muslim representation in a love story that hits real-life issues on the way to a very satisfying conclusion." (Booklist)

"Jalaluddin follows Ayesha at Last with another charming contemporary romance, which maintains a fun, energetic mood while tackling serious themes of prejudice." (Publishers Weekly)

"Packed with emotion, this romance is also a beautifully written coming-of-age story about a first-generation immigrant. Hana is a relatable, flawed narrator, and the other characters are complex, nuanced, and well-developed. The story is intricately plotted, with dramatic, often heartwrenching scenes that build to a satisfying, realistic conclusion.... Readers won’t be able to put this Own Voices Muslim romance down." (Library Journal, starred review)

What listeners say about Hana Khan Carries On

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authentic, heartfelt and endearing

I absolutely loved this story. It was really nice to hear indian culture being portrayed authentically, and I learnt more about the Muslim experience abroad, as there is always more to learn. the characters are all endearing, a lot happens in terms of plot but it's all wrapped up, and the pacing to a great too. A new favourite for sure

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  • Brianna
  • 16-04-21

Worth it

Didn't pack as intense of a punchas Ayesha ar Last, but still so so good!

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  • SB
  • 16-04-21

Disappointing.. I could not carry on

I loved Ayesha at Last, but this one was a disappointing follow up. It read like more of a teen/young adult effort. It relied on a borrowed plot (You've Got Mail), but I found nothing compellingly unique in the retelling. It fell flat overall in my opinion.

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  • mommymuslimah
  • 03-09-21

Hooked from the start

I like books that hook you from the start, and this one did just that. Once I started, I couldn’t put the book down (or stop listening to it in this case). It’s clean yet modern romance with a couple surprises and a happy ending. I found myself tearing, and laughing along with the characters in the novel. Definitely worth a read.

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  • AD
  • 18-08-21

Exceeding all my expectations

I came in expecting a warm & fuzzy rom-com, a halal version of *spoilers alert* 'You've got mail' according to some of the headlines.
But I was pleasantly surprised by a much deeper and richer storyline, all while keeping it "light". My new favorite author shows off her talent, by creating witty, smart and poignant characters and dialogues, all while easily showcasing the culture & the internal & external challenges. I really connected with the characters & found myself crying and/or cheering with them. I might be biased though, since I come from a similar background.
Wishing you all the best & can't wait for the Amazon show to drop!

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  • Amina
  • 30-07-21

A charming story!

Our heroine is witty, clever, Indian, and Muslim, and this a lovely story about her aspirations, finding her passions, growing up, and of course, love! It’s a fun, lighthearted listen and the representation is a refreshing, tasteful appreciation of Indian-Canadian culture, food & family. Also, the narrator is fantastic and really captures the spirit of the story!

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  • Dana Al-Basha
  • 11-05-21

Hana’s Podcast

You've Got Mail is one of my favorite movies, and I loved Ayesha At Last, I preordered the book instantly and was surprised by the beauty of the cover!

Hana is a daughter of a chef, her mom owns a restaurant in Canada that isn't doing well, her dream is to become a radio host, she has a podcast and a crush on one of her listeners. Things go south when a new trendy halal restaurant opens and she has an instant attraction with the owner Aydin, their family from India comes to visit while her father battles his illness and her pregnant sister is with them. A hate crime makes her face their situation and where she stands. One thing I didn't understand: How didn't Aydin recognize her voice? Usually, someone into radio has a distinctive voice, and he's her oldest follower.

I love the sense of the Muslim community in Uzma's books, and how this community is part of a bigger community in Canada in general. I wish I was a part of such a loveling close-knitted community, as an expat, we're always out of place.

I got to say in chapter 8 I felt that Hana should have also added the obvious:
بني الإسلام على خمس : شهادة أن لا إله إلا الله ، وأن محمدا رسول الله ، وإقام الصلاة ، وإيتاء الزكاة، وصوم رمضان ، وحج البيت لمن أستطاع اليه سبيلا
translation of hadeeth: Islam was built on five pillars: the testimony that there is no God except Allah and that Muhammad (God's prayer and peace be upon him) is His slave and Messenger, to pray, to give Zakaat (obligatory charity), to fast in Ramadan, and to perform Hajj (pilgrimage) if you are able. The author forgot the most important one: that Prophet Mohammed is God's messenger; as for Jihad, it's not a bad word, and Muslims shouldn't feel ashamed of it, even when they live with foreigners, it means fighting for God and other Muslims when it's needed. Jihad is not only on the battlefield it can be in any form of work, where you push yourself to excel for God, like in your work, raising your children, helping others, etc. When the teacher said prove it, she should've said, this is my faith, not yours, I practice it and this is a Hadeeth by our Prophet who you even forgot to mention. Jihad is very important and required of each Muslim but these five pillars are the fundamental beliefs of Islam.

In chapter 36, Muslims aren't buried in coffins, our bodies are our coffins, and we are returned from death in just our bodies and a shroud of white cloth, the same ones we go to hajj in, so we are buried naked in the ground. There are no pine coffins for Muslims. We believe in grave awakening; even the cloth is loosened upon placing the body in the grave.

I loved Ayesha at Last, this was a very modern retelling of You’ve Got Mail, and Uzma gave us something new and contemporary about hate crimes, competition, letting go, and new beginnings. I liked the story but I didn’t love it. The warmth in You've Got Mail is missing, the sense of everything being good and everyone kind even sworn enemies is not here. I always thought that You've Got Mail is a modern retelling of Pride and Prejudice that's why Joe and Kathleen spoke of it. I guess this is Uzma's favorite book.

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  • Sunshine
  • 29-04-21

A Well Told Story

I enjoyed listening to this familiar story told with a cultural twist. It was well written and well read.