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Publisher's Summary

To survive in the Ends, ex-military Cutter must assemble a team of women, both human and mutated Enders.

A nuclear blast has transformed the world into a barren wasteland. Survival depends on your ability to kick ass and take names.

Radiation transforms select humans into mutated creatures who are banished from society - Enders. The males are libido-less wild animals incapable of satisfying the females, who are hot, forward and badass.

Cutter has kept to himself for 10 years, avoiding the conflict with a sharp tongue, stiff drink and his two best friends, his six-shooters, Alpha and Beta. But the perils of the wastelands won't leave him the hell alone. Two sisters, one human and one Ender, offer him a generous salary to protect them as they set off on a doomed peace mission. It's an offer he can't refuse, even as he knows there's no chance in hell of their succeeding.

All the odds are stacked against them, but Cutter soon learns his destiny is to be more than just a bodyguard, even if it involves forging together a crack team of gorgeous human and Ender operatives who will make the insane mission much more pleasurable.

Warning: Contains a harem.

©2019 Sam Ryder (P)2019 Podium Publishing

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
  • Milksteak
  • 25-05-20

A gritty wild west post-apocalypse

==UPDATE Amazon/Audible recently changed how they format their reviews. While you can put paragraph breaks into reviews when composing them, they will no longer be displayed on an audiobook's review screen. So now my reviews have retroactively become barely readable. The only answer I've gotten from support is that this is just how Amazon wants it to be now, and they're sorry for the inconvenience. Since I'm too lazy to abridge my reviews, and our benevolent Amazon overlords don't give a shit, please enjoy the following wall of text. END UPDATE==



This may be a story set in an alternate modern-day (or near future), but you might as well just picture this one as a western. The stereotypical protagonist is a mysterious loner, and true to the trope, the opening scene in the tavern sets the tone for the rest of the book.

Cutter can be a cold bastard, but he isn't a bad guy—he's just had his fill of the world and learned that being alone is often easier than caring about anything. So when two beautiful women come into his life, asking for help, he, of course, wants no part of it. But coin and curiosity get the better of him, and he sets out on a journey to see if there is more to himself and the world he lives in.

That plot is entertaining enough, if not especially original. I don't have as much patience with the gruff loner type protagonists as most, so after a while his broody commitment to no commitments or caring got a bit stale. But his personality doesn't come across as too abrasive. Most of this book is essentially him just breaking down the walls that keep him from caring about the world or the people around him. Some time, of course, is spent advancing the overall journey, but don't expect much to happen in this book—it feels like it is mostly setting the stage for the next two.

Compared to other haremlit books, this one is generally better written. It is not without some frustrations, though. Some might consider the below minor spoilers, so if you don't want to read them, suffice it to say the plot is carried on at a couple points by minor cases of plot armor and plot induced stupidity.

There are a couple interactions between the MC and one of the antagonists that seem a bit contrived. When the man that is out to kill the MC and his companions ambushes them, they both kind of let each other go. At first the bad guy has the drop on them, but doesn't take advantage of it. Then the main group outguns him, and just lets him go. It's kind of explained later that the other antagonist wants them alive so that he can deliver a monologue before he kills them, but it just seems super convenient that pointless vanity saves them, and that isn't the only time.

Then, the MC decides to confront the antagonist in broad daylight, supposedly to learn information, but he only confirms what they already know. Plus, at this point in the book, the MC isn't aware of the partner-antagonist's stupid order to not kill him, so from the MC's perspective, he is walking up to the man that wants to kill him, surrounded by his goons, just for some unnecessary fact checking. It lets the author flesh out the antagonist a little bit more, but the whole exchange felt stupid and clunky.

One of the main plot points is the premonition powers of his Ender companion. Throughout the book she gets premonitions of danger, and is never wrong. Leading up the the ultimate conflict of the book, She gets another one of these premonitions,,, and they do nothing. Predictably, ignoring the premonition puts them in a bad spot.

Then, in the final conflict, there is a *very* telegraphed ambush set up. Why the MC chooses to assume the signs of trouble are harmless is beyond me, but little is more annoying than, as a reader, seeing something obviously telegraphed and remarked upon by the MC, then reading as the supposedly competent MC decides to ignore it.

Anyway, there are a few more issues like those in the story, but some of the annoyance I have is probably just coming from having the perspective of a reader, rather than the characters. These issues didn't keep me from enjoying the book, which is decent overall.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Badstad
  • 12-05-20

awesome

I love this Sean Rowe this seems to be a good series so far.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Avid Fantasy Reader
  • 09-09-19

Started with a punch but ran out of common sense.

I was very hopeful at the start. However, when has it ever been accepable to pass over looting your enemies weapons. Sure our main group loots coin from their foes, but they do not bother picking up any firearms or ammunition until it painfully clear that they are in need. Logically that makes no sense in any Post Apocalyptic world where everything is of value, particularly weapons.

Also why does our main character not shoot his arch nemesis in the back while he has the opportunity. It is fully proven later in the story that he has no problem with shooting men in the back. It was clear to see that the man walking away from our m/c was going to attack again when given any opportunity. This inaction makes no sense accept to foreshadow a man who would no doubt be major trouble. Where is the logic to letting such a man live. Becouse I don't see it.

1 person found this helpful