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Publisher's Summary

A provocative look at how today's trade conflicts are caused by governments promoting the interests of elites at the expense of workers.

Trade disputes are usually understood as conflicts between countries with competing national interests, but as Matthew C. Klein and Michael Pettis show in this book, they are often the unexpected result of domestic political choices to serve the interests of the rich at the expense of workers and ordinary retirees.

Klein and Pettis trace the origins of today's trade wars to decisions made by politicians and business leaders in China, Europe, and the United States over the past 30 years. Across the world, the rich have prospered while workers can no longer afford to buy what they produce, have lost their jobs, or have been forced into higher levels of debt.

In this thought-provoking challenge to mainstream views, the authors provide a cohesive narrative that shows how the class wars of rising inequality are a threat to the global economy and international peace-and what we can do about it.

©2020 Matthew C. Klein and Michael Pettis (P)2020 Tantor

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What listeners say about Trade Wars Are Class Wars

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fabulous

a very easy to understand treatment of a very complicated subject

everyone can benefit from a reading/hearing of this and understand policy implications in their own countries

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awesome and breathtaking and definitely insightful

awesome and breathtaking and definitely insightful work. it's a must read for all. excellent work

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  • dugmartssch
  • 22-05-20

Narrator is robotic

I think I'll buy this book as a hardcopy and give it another shot but Siri reads text with more intonation and emphasis . Completely impossible to listen to, I don't think a human read this. Listened to another book narrated by Bob Souer and this 1000% was not read by him. Don't do this audible it's terrible.

8 people found this helpful

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  • Gerry Perez
  • 05-07-20

Interesting prospective on global trade

Thought provoking book, with an excellent history of global trade imbalances and interesting speculation on their causes. Conclusions about how to correct current imbalances challenge every day solutions, and should promote some good policy discussions. Highly recommend reading this.

2 people found this helpful

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  • Thomas
  • 11-06-22

This book should be required reading for every political representative in the world.

In a lengthy, well-researched, complicated 8 hours you will be educated beyond any political messaging, naive economics, and moralization of policy you may have been subjected to in your life. The authors explain in convincing fashion the root causes of the economic trends that are causing deepening class divides in the industrial world. Though I am far less optimistic than are the authors as to the global powers ability to overcome these challenges, I am better for knowing why we are where we are. Thank you so much.

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  • UCHENNA
  • 17-01-22

A compelling position. Hard to disagree with.

the authors make a compelling argument on the causes and solutions to the global imbalances. Difficult but interesting read.

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  • Rachel Hunt
  • 04-11-21

Unlistenable

I’m really interested to read this book. The narration here is extremely fast and monotone, hard to listen to and impossible to keep your attention and follow. Will read it instead.

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  • Guanhuan wang
  • 03-11-21

Bad narrator

Good book,bad narrator. Read so fast for such a complex book. Should be slow and make pause sometimes.

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  • Cuiping Deng
  • 23-05-21

Insightful and Knowledgeable

If you want to understand more about the root behind the purpose of trade wars, them this book offers excellent insight. This book really helped open my eyes to many ideas and concepts that were foreign to me.

The only complaint I have is the narrator's breathing. In an earbud it can get annoying.

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  • Omar
  • 30-12-20

Could not put Down

Very insightful book about how global capital flows
lower the worlds economic output and employment.

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  • David B.
  • 16-10-20

Speaking of class...

Well-written, well-narrated. this book really made me think about inequality in our society today, and in particular about how I can't believe Jeff Bezos made so much money while Amazon workers contracted COVID-19 due to unsafe workplace policies with minimal hazard pay and were fired (and in some cases smeared and ruined) for organizing for dignified working conditions.

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  • Andy G.
  • 09-08-20

sounds like it was narrated by machine

I'm currently at the end of 3rd chapter and can say 2 things:

1. It's extremely boring to listen. The lifeless, monotonic narration sounds like machine. I wonder if Audible does refunds for computer generated narration, because that one sure sounds like one.

2. 3 chapters and it's still historical exposition, that is pretty strangely structured: it went to 20th century once, then it went back to the 17th, while repeating similar narration. Sounds like filler. So far not much argumentation.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 21-09-21

Impossible to hear this boring robotic narration

The topic is quite useful and interesting, but this lifeless narration... like a machine gun throwing words no stop. Could not hear to end.
Update: listening at 0.85x helped significantly

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  • Dinesh Anthony Perera
  • 23-01-21

Screw the rich

Breaks down how massive trade surpluses distort how value is distributed within an economy.

Not that I had a problem with the reader (gave it 5 stars) but I can see how someone who is sensitive to a prolonged monotone reading style would find this irritating. That being said the writing style means that every sentence feels like the last so I don't know how much of it is the narrator's fault.

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  • Hugh Selwyn Mauberley
  • 20-09-20

Robotic narrator never pauses

Just like the classes in surplus economies, not all sentences are equal; although in this audiobook the narrator reads them as if they were, without pausing between paragraphs or providing any vocal emphasis to guide the listener through complex arguments. The key sentences which set out the book’s thesis are read with the same intonation and at the same pace as all the others.

This makes for an extremely tedious listen. For all I could tell, however, the book is an excellent and refreshing polemic on international trade, which has been highly praised by Martin Wolf and others. That said, there is a great deal of exposition which is merely asserted, and the book rambles through rather familiar history which did not seem particularly germane.

Buy the book instead.

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  • Sathyan Nair
  • 14-03-22

Great insight!!!

Inequality from accrual of capital create so much problem in the world. In democracy one voter equals one vote, but capitalism the richer the voter the larger his vote.

1 person found this helpful