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Train to Pakistan

Written by: Khushwant Singh
Narrated by: Paul Thottam
Length: 6 hrs and 26 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (80 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Mano Majra is a place, Khushwant Singh tells us at the beginning of this classic novel, where Sikhs and Muslims have lived together in peace for hundreds of years. Then one day, at the end of the summer, the "ghost train" arrives, a silent, incredible funeral train loaded with the bodies of thousands of refuges, bringing the village its first taste of the horrors of the civil war. Train to Pakistan is the story of this isolated village that is plunged into the abyss of religious hate. It is also the story of a Sikh boy and a Muslim girl whose love endures and transcends the ravages of war.

©1956, 2018 Khushwant Singh (P)2018 Random House Audio

What listeners say about Train to Pakistan

Average Customer Ratings
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    4 out of 5 stars
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Worth a Try

Amazing and horrifying at the same time , the characters in this story , their ideology , their conversation seemed so real . once I started this book I was unable stop , the last chapter was amazing .
Narration was too slow and could have been better .

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Great book about secularism. Great idea of India.

Wow raw thoughts presented. Happy and contended. Nice characters. Very real. Khushwant singh great work.

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    3 out of 5 stars

Indian authors and mediocrity quite synonymous

Not a great book. just read khalil gibran and you will actually detest the so called Indian style of writing and narration. Plot was non existent. Just random text.

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should have been 2 stars but for Mr Singh

struggled to finish it. narrator has a grating voice. stayed away due to it.

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Overdoing the details

I was told this was a good read, so I bought it.
A few chapters in, the hugely deep detail killed it for me.
I mean you can spend a few lines desctibing, for example, a shirt, if it is relevant.
In this book not only does it go into details of that 'shirt', but he gets into each button of said shirt, as well as each buttonhole, and each hole into which the button is stitched to the shirt.
Detail to the point of drowning in minutae.
I gave up.
I am sure there is some good somewhere, but it didn't hold it for me.

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Disappointed with the highly appreciated story.

A good story but not a fine one. The fine details of unnecessary things like flies andlizard and a singer and a megistrate's fear are given even though there was a lot of potency for the real plight of people of ManuMajra who suffered in the partition should be given. The end is also so stale and not appealing. I think the writer's of current decade are more mature in writing than the so acclaimed Khushwant Singh. A little disappointed ☹️

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Good book

It gives glimpses of what happened during partition, well written and narrated thanks, it was my first book on audible

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First class story telling

This book perfectly tells you how innocent people are changed into blood thirsty mobs, just by senseless talks of religious unity. That blind hysteria to kill others, just on the basis of ' felt' vengeance and not seen.

Must read to get a glimpse of how humans think as religious groups..

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WOW

It was a revelation that population back then we're facing the issues that are prevalent till this date. performance was more English than the desi background it was written in.

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A beautifully written story

the last line was the most memorable one. Beautifully written, depicting love alwyas wins over hatred.

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  • Kelly
  • 20-12-19

the scenes of war are unforgettable

Train to Pakistan by Khushwant Singh is a story about the violence during Hindustan and the creation of Pakistan in 1947. It is a book about violence and war. It is about heroes and villains -- but it doesn't place one group of people in the hero category and one in the villain category. Rather it show us that there were good and bad people on both sides of the coin. It is a devastating, brutal and chaotic read because that is the truth of the events.

I learned a lot from this book. I knew almost nothing about the Punjab or the events that occurred when the partition of India occurred. I will be reading more.

There were so many scenes that linger in my mind and horrify my memory, but the most vivid were the moments when the the train was filled with corpses. I will never forget it.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Kayla Dawnn House
  • 25-05-20

The book and story are great!

The book and story are great! However, several places in the audiobook repeat sentences or seem to skip forward.

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  • expatbore
  • 02-08-20

Extraordinary story sadly undermined by terrible narration

Train to Pakistan is a brilliantly realised story of a small village on the Pakistan Indian border right after partition. It speaks of the dignity, grace, tolerance of the Sikh Hindu and Muslim communities, then torn apart by sectarian violence, to which the village’s lonely train station bears witness.

Unfortunately the narrator cannot cope with the inflections and pronunciations of this English version. His voice is beautiful, but his understanding of the cadence of English I’m afraid is unforgivable: the narration is full of sentences that seem to stop halfway and start again, and extraordinary mispronunciations of e.g. ‘mangey’

I will however always love his pronunciations of Indian words such as Char Pie (?sp)